Category Archives: Liberal Arts

sfu_grads

Questions Answered: Should I transfer to a different school?

sfu_gradsQuestion: A bunch of my friends from high school and I got together over winter break. All of them went to big universities in our home state, while I went away to a small liberal arts college in a different state. They were all teasing me that I would never find a job with my degree because I go to such a small unknown school. I like my school a lot, and have made a lot of friends, but it is super expensive. Since I got back to campus, I’ve been stewing on all the teasing and now I am seriously thinking about transferring next fall! If I ask people at my school, of course they will tell me it’s a bad idea. And if I ask people at the public schools back home, I’m sure they will tell me it’s a good idea! So I kind of need an unbiased opinion? Will going to my small school make it hard for me to find good employment? ~ Jenna T.

Answer: Transferring schools is definitely a big decision and I applaud you for gathering information before coming to a final conclusion. While I currently work for a small liberal arts university, I graduated from a much larger public university, so I can absolutely appreciate the value of both types of institutions. Let’s take a moment to consider the pros to each:
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Explore Multiple Disciplines

Quick Tips for College Freshmen: Explore Multiple Disciplines

Even if you’re completely sure about your choice of major, it’s still a good idea to explore multiple disciplines, and your freshman year in college is a great time to start. There’s usually less room in your academic schedule to fit in classes from other departments the further along you get in your major, so take the time to explore […]

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Lesser-Known Psychology Fields

The Road Little Traveled: Lesser-Known Psychology Fields

Guest Author: Karah Snyderman
Perhaps when you think of psychology, you imagine someone lying on a leather sofa, hands folded on his stomach, facing away from a well-dressed, distinguished-looking older man with a clipboard and a pen who’s jotting down notes as they talk. The patient is unburdening himself, maybe sniffling a little. This is certainly one aspect of the multifaceted psychology field, but it’s in no way at all comprehensive.

In fact, today there are more niches in psychology than ever before. As psychology has become more prominent and the stigma of seeking out a personal psychologist has eroded (in fact, it’s almost chic to have a therapist anymore), the field has become saturated with eager and inquisitive new students, who focus on popular subfields like clinical, social and even forensic psychology. What’s really beyond the therapist’s couch, you wonder? The answer is: some interesting and lesser-known careers in psychology.

Sports Psychology
Nothing is more exciting in the sports world than two big talents with big personalities clashing on the field. And in fact, personality is one area of study within the sport psychology field. Sport psych is defined as a multidisciplinary science that fuses psychology with Kinesiology, which is the study of human movement. Broadly, the field analyzes how the participation in sports effects both the mind and the body; sport psychologists also seek to explore how the honing and development of psychological skills affects athletic performance. For example, a sport psychologist might be interested in how goal-setting and imagery affects individual performance and final outcome during a big game. Yet sport psychology is also interested in coaching, team building and youth sport.
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Impressive Changes at WFU’s Office of Personal & Career Development

In December of 2008, I responded to an article by Wake Forest University president Nathan Hatch in which he laid out, among other things, the importance of enhancing college career centers in order to allow them to focus on career development, not just job placement. At the time, I absolutely agreed, but also offered my thoughts on how, from a […]

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