Tag Archives: Career Advice for College Students

academic_probation

Questions Answered: I’m on academic probation; will I still get a job?

academic_probationQuestion: I am finishing my freshman year in college as a computer science major. I did really well in high school and have always been a good student (like 4.0 from sophomore to senior year in hs) but suddenly I am failing!! I am now on academic probation and if I don’t raise my gradse then I’d be kicked out! My classmates and parents tell me this will make it impossible to get an internship or get a job. Will this ruin my chances to get a internship or a job??? ~ Ju-won P., Portland, OR

Answer: First things, first. We need to determine the root cause of your failing grades. In the long run, employers care most about a continuous pattern of behavior. If this academic year is just an anomaly, (i.e., it never happens again), then the negative impact of this year’s low grades will be minimal. However, if you are not able to identify what caused your grades to drop this year, are not able to remedy the situation, and therefore continue with a pattern of low grades, then yes, your chances of finding internships and jobs will be negatively impacted.

There are many different reasons why grades can suddenly suffer. Here are just a few possible reasons why grades could suddenly drop and tips for pulling your grades back up.

1. Too much autonomy – As a first year student, you may be adjusting to having a lot more autonomy and not having teachers “nag” you about getting homework or assignments done.
Tips:

  • Consider working with your school’s learning center to develop effective time management skills that will match your needs and personality.
  • You may also want to connect with a trusted friend or family member to act as an accountability partner to help you stay on task.

(more…)

Read More

David R. Bradford

Networking in College, an Interview with David Bradford

We had the opportunity to ask David Bradford, “The Bottlecap Kid”, for networking advice for college students and young professionals. His advice is practical and realistic; check it out. SC: What are practical ways for college freshmen to begin networking? David: Be curious. Ask lots of questions. Find areas of commonality. When that happens, trust forms and magic can happen. […]

Read More

Don't Panic

Quick Tips: Save backup copies of your resume!

Don't PanicYou work so hard to tailor your resume for each specific position. You word-smith and tweak, re-size and fuss until it is absolutely perfect. You submit the resume for the job and follow up with the employer a few days later, only to receive awful news. The file got corrupted somehow and they couldn’t read your resume!! You tell them it’s not a problem and that you’ll re-submit right away, but quickly discover that your resume file is completely corrupted on your hard drive!

To avoid the scenario above, here are some tips to ensure you always have backups of your resume. Some of these tips may seem over the top, but if you ever find yourself in a situation where your computer has failed or your file has been corrupted and you need to re-send your resume to an employer, you will appreciate having extra copies available. Many of these tips can also be applied to your cover letters, and to any other important documents.

  • Don’t just save over older versions of your resume whenever you tailor a new version for a new job. Save a brand new document, naming it lastname_resume_jobtitle_company.docx
  • Save the final copy (the one you submitted for the job) in a few different locations, such as:
    • on your hard drive,
    • on a USB key or other portable drive,
    • in a cloud service (such as Dropbox, Google Drive, Box, iCloud, etc.), and
    • email it to yourself and save the email in a folder called “Application Materials.”
  • Keep your LinkedIn profile up-to-date. This is a good idea for any job seeker, but if you find you’ve lost your resume file, you can pull information from your profile as a last resort.
  • If your school has a career management tool, take advantage of the option to upload different versions of your resume to your account.
  • Finally, for a low-tech back-up solution, keep printouts of your tailored resumes with the name of the company to which it had been sent, written in pencil, in a corner on the back.

Recovering your file
If you find you’ve already lost your resume and are desperate to get it back, there are a couple of options: (more…)

Read More