Tag Archives: Jessica Holbrook Hernandez

Stop Being Lost in the Crowd – Capture the Hiring Manager’s Attention with a Branded LinkedIn Profile

Guest Author: Jessica has a true passion for the job seeker, evidenced by her desire to share everything she can with everyone she can about resume writing and interviewing.
Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

Is your LinkedIn profile a verbatim recreation of your resume? Or is it a unique and complementary representation of you and your job search? I know a plethora of job seekers who simply cut and paste their resumes right into their LinkedIn profiles. Let me tell you why this is NOT the best job search strategy. I’ll also tell you how to capture the hiring manager’s attention and—potentially—the interview.

1. If you’re putting your LinkedIn profile address on your resume, then you can expect employers to go there (You are putting this on your resume, right? Please tell me you’re including this on your resume!). So instead of just repeating what they’ve already just read, give them something new, inspiring, and something that makes them want to connect. Hiring managers don’t just hire skills—they hire personalities. Let them see part of yours—and make it shine.
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Avoiding Company-Specific Lingo on Your Resume

Guest Author: Jessica Holbrook Hernandez is an expert resume writer, career and personal branding strategist, author, and presenter.
Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

I recently met a woman who had started a new job with a Fortune 50 company several months ago. While she enjoyed some aspects of her new position, she was having a very difficult time adjusting to the culture of her new company due to the other employees constantly using acronyms she didn’t understand. The situation is so bad that every day she writes down a list of terms that she doesn’t grasp and asks her assistant to explain them.

This is a fairly extreme example of corporate culture gone awry, but it reminded me of something I see often in reviewing resumes. Candidates who have worked for one company or in one industry for a long time often fill their resumes with acronyms and jargon that would only make sense to another employee at their current company. People often don’t even notice that they‘re doing this, as they have been using these terms for years and forget that not everyone knows them.

A related issue is candidates capitalizing terms on their resume because they’re used to seeing them written that way by their current employer. For instance, while your current company may have you complete a Baseline Analysis of Risk report every time a critical incident occurs, your resume will read much more clearly if you simply write, “completed risk analysis of serious incidents”.
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